Fernando Sor – the New Complete Works for Guitar, the new 2020 second edition by Brian Jeffery

Fernando Sor

I’m delighted to announce the publication of my new 2020 second edition of the New Complete Works for Guitar of Fernando Sor from Tecla Editions.
This new second edition is digital and online, not printed.
More information about this new edition is here.
The list below gives information about each item.
27 items are FREE TO EVERYBODY. Read more about these FREE TO EVERYBODY items.

Brian Jeffery
Tecla Editions
www.tecla.com

Contents:

GUITAR SOLOS

Opus 1: Six Divertimentos
Sor’s Six Divertimentos [op. 1] are six short pieces. None of them is very difficult, but their charm and their great suitability for the guitar place them among Sor’s most rewarding compositions for the player of moderate accomplishments. They were first published in London in about 1815 soon after Sor had arrived there from Paris. It was just a few weeks before the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815, which may be why Sor composed the fine military march which is the sixth piece in the set.
The March op. 1 no. 6 is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 2: Six Divertimentos
Sor’s Six Divertimentos for the Spanish Guitar [op. 2] were first published in London in about 1815-19 and consist of six short and charming pieces. Sor dedicated the set to his friend Emanuel Palacio Fajardo who was a South American from what is now Venezuela. A trained lawyer and doctor of medicine and an emissary of Simón Bolívar, he was in Europe to obtain guns and money for the liberation movements against Spain, and he returned to Venezuela in 1818. He and Sor could have met either in Paris or in London.

Opus 3: Theme and variations
Sor’s Theme and variations [op. 3] were first published in Paris in about 1804-1810 and therefore most probably date from the time when Sor was still in Spain, that is to say from 1813 or before.

Opus 4: Fantasia
Sor’s Fantasia [op. 4] in rondo form, whose limpidity and modest technical demands go hand in hand, was first published in London in about 1815-18. A gentle introduction marked Andante Largo (that is, in the terminology of the time, Largo, with steady movement and not necessarily as slow as the term Andante might indicate today) leads into an extended and lively Rondo.

Opus 5: Six petites pièces
Sor’s Six petites pièces [op. 5] were first published in Paris in 1814. Like opp. 1 and 2, which date from a similar period, this is a set of six contrasting pieces. They may have been originally composed in Paris at that time, or they may possibly incorporate material from Sor’s earlier period in Spain.
The set is dedicated to Sor’s wife who was with Sor in Paris at that moment. The set includes the famous Andante largo which is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 6: Twelve studies
Sor’s twelve studies [op. 6], full of strength and lyricism, were the first of Sor’s famous didactic pieces for the guitar, and were first published in London under the title Studio for the Spanish Guitar in about 1815/17.
Sor was about 37 and at the height of his powers, enjoying great success in London after he had been forced to flee from Spain at the end of the Peninsular War. He appears to have lived in Charlotte Street, near the north London area where most of the Spanish exiles lived. His concerts and pupils were many; his songs poured from the presses; and the manager of the King’s Theatre, John Ebers, called him “the extraordinary Spaniard Sor, who is known to be the most perfect guitarist in the world”.
The study op. 6 no. 1 is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 7: Fantasia
Sor’s fantasia [op. 7] was first published in Paris in 1814 and probably composed there. It is undoubtedly a virtuoso work, a major piece from a time when he was at the height of his powers. A contemporary, one who heard him play this piece at the Argyll Rooms in London in 1817, wrote of it in the Giulianiad in 1833:
“…I trust it will not be considered as prejudice on my part when I say, that the beautiful compositions of Sor have touched and inspired my soul above all others”.

Opus 8: Six Divertimentos
Sor’s Six Divertimentos [op. 8] are another set of six short pieces from Sor’s London period, published there by Rutter & McCarthy in 1818-19. Once again it is evident that the set has been planned as a whole, with contrast of keys and of tempi, and performance as a whole is recommended.
The Minuet and Waltz op. 8 nos 1 and 2 are FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 9: Variations on a Theme of Mozart
Sor’s variations on a theme from Mozart’s The Magic Flute [op. 9] are among his most famous works. They are dedicated to his brother Carlos Sor who had also escaped from Spain at the end of the war there and had joined his brother in Paris and then from 1820 to 1821 visited him in London where both brothers taught the guitar. It is a grand work with five variations and a coda which makes a triumphal end to the work.

Opus 10: Fantaisie
Sor’s fantasia op. 10 was first published by Meissonnier in Paris in about 1817-22 with the title Troisième Fantaisie, at a time when Sor was living in London. A slow introduction leads into a melodious theme, followed by two variations; then a section called Majeur which is rather an interlude than a true variation; then two more variations and a coda conclude this fine extended work. The sixth string should be tuned to F, a practice not unusual in Sor’s time (it was used, for example, in op. 1, no. 6).

Opus 11: Deux thèmes variés et douze menuets
Sor’s Deux thèmes variés et douze menuets op. 11 are something of a miscellaneous collection and first appeared in Paris in 1822 or shortly before. The twelve minuets are in an unusual style, with their abrupt changes of register, their sudden running passages, and their scordaturas. They are among the finest of Sor’s miniatures and have deservedly kept their popularity over many years. Some are certainly from Sor’s Spanish period, and it is quite possible that they all are: see Chapter 1 of my book Fernando Sor, Composer and Guitarist.

Opus 12: Fantasia
Sor’s fantasia [op. 12] was first published in London in 1815 or shortly after. A fine extended work, it is in fact a set of variations and is an elaboration of the simpler set on the same theme which is today known as op. 3 and which dates from Sor’s Spanish period. Sor has added an introduction, coda, and three new variations. The new work is dedicated to Friedrich Kalkbrenner, the famous pianist who lived in London from 1814 to 1823, that is exactly the same period as Sor. Variation 7 is a fine example of the ancient guitar and lute technique of campanelas.

Opus 13: Six divertimentos
Sor’s Six Divertimentos [op. 13] are another charming set of six short pieces, again first published in London, in 1819. As with the previous sets of divertimentos opp. 1, 2, and 8, this set begins with a short minuet introducing a waltz in the same key, followed by a longer piece in a different key. No. 4, Cantabile, is the same piece as op. 11, minuet no. 12. A long and delightful Andante Pastorale, and a march, conclude the set, which, once again, could with advantage be performed as a whole.

Opus 14: Sonata prima (“Grand Solo”)
Sor’s first sonata [op. 14] (later known as “Grand Solo”) is justly famous today as a grand full-scale work, eloquent and moving sometimes into remote keys. It may very well be the same piece that Sor played in a concert in Barcelona on 7 May 1802 (see my book Fernando Sor Composer and Guitarist, chapter 1). Grandiose, imaginative, using the resources of the instrument to the full, it certainly dates from Sor’s Spanish period and was first published as Sonata Prima by Salvador Castro de Gistau in Paris in 1810 or shortly before, without opus number. As a one-movement sonata, it has affinities with the keyboard works of Scarlatti and of Soler.

Opus 15(a): Folies d’Espagne and minuet
Sor’s Folies d’Espagne [op. 15(a)] is one of his most delightful works, published in Paris by Meissonnier in about 1822-25 with the title Les Folies d’Espagne, variées, et un Menuet. A theme and four variations in E minor followed by a minuet, it shows a natural musical gift, lyricism, and strength: surely one of the most attractive guitar pieces of this period.
The beginning of Folies d’Espagne is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 15(b): Sonata
Sor’s sonata in C, now known as op. 15(b), consists of a single movement, an allegretto. It is an uncompromising work, developing its ideas to the full and concentrating on musical values rather than on what the guitar can easily do. As a one-movement sonata, it again has affinities with the keyboard sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti.
The beginning of this sonata is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 15(c): Thème varié
This Thème varié uses the same theme as the first set of variations in op. 11. It was first published in Paris in about 1822.

Opus 16: Fantasia on Paisiello’s ‘Nel cor più non mi sento’
Sor’s fantasia op. 16 on Paisiello’s aria “Nel cor più non mi sento” is an extended set of variations using many of the different techniques possible on the guitar.

Opus 17: Six Waltzes, Book One
Sor’s set of six waltzes, op. 17, was first published in Paris in 1824.

Opus 18: Six Waltzes, Book Two
Sor’s set of six waltzes, op. 18, was first published in Paris in 1824.
The waltz op. 18 no. 5 is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 19: Six Airs from The Magic Flute
Sor’s arrangements of items from The Magic Flute, op. 19, were first published in Paris in 1824 with the title Six airs choisis de l’Opéra de Mozart: II Flauto Magico. The work in its original edition is dedicated to M. Amédée, a name which is puzzling as it stands. But could it have a connection with the Christian name of the composer of the Magic Flute?
The contents are as follows:

  1. Marche religieuse. This is the march at the beginning of Act 2 of the Magic Flute.
  2. Fuggite o voi beltà fallace. A duet in Act 2, sung by two priests.
  3. Giá fan ritorno i genii amici. A trio, sung by three boys.
  4. O dolce armonia. Part of the finale to Act 1. The theme on which Sor wrote his Variations op. 9.
  5. Se potesse un suono. Part of the finale to Act 1. Sung by Pamina and Papageno.
  6. Grand’Isi! Grand’Osiri! A chorus sung by priests and Sarastro.

Opus 20: Introduction et thème varié
Sor’s Introduction et thème varié op. 20 were first published in Paris in 1824. They are based on the same theme as a Thema Varié published by Castro in 1810 or shortly before (it is in this present edition). The theme is not unlike “Ein Mädchen oder Weibchen” from the Magic Flute.

Opus 21: La Despedida (‘Les Adieux’)
Sor’s Les Adieux op. 21 may have been composed in London in 1816 on the occasion of the departure from London of Sor’s colleague the violinist Francesco Vaccari. A copy of the French edition of this present work which was in the collection of the late Robert Spencer, London (no doubt now in the Royal Academy of Music, London) bears a manuscript note: “A Dios. F. Sor a su amigo F. Vaccari. Londres 28 de Julio de 1816”.

Opus 22: Sonata
Sor’s sonata now known as op. 22 must have been composed by Sor in some form in Spain in or before 1808, because it bears the heading in its Paris edition of 1825: “Grand[e] Sonate de Sor, qui fut dédiée au prince de la Paix”, and the Prince de la Paix was Manuel Godoy, Prime Minister of Spain and virtual ruler of that country in the last years before the Napoleonic invasion, who fell from power in 1808. But as yet we have no early source for the sonata, and the Paris 1825 edition remains at present our earliest known source.

Opus 23: Divertissement
Sor’s Divertissement op. 23 is a collection of small pieces first published in Paris in 1825 at a time when Sor was in Moscow. Its bibliographical history is confusing, and that is why the numbering of the pieces in this edition is not continuous. For those interested, the details are set out in the commentary of the work.

Opus 24: Huit petites pièces
Sor’s Huit petites pièces op. 24 consist of a number of short pieces first published in Paris in 1827. Six of the pieces are minuets. The fact that six of the eight pieces have the somewhat archaic scordatura of the sixth string to F, as well as their style, suggests that these pieces are likely to date from Sor’s Spanish period.

Opus 25: Sonata
Sor’s sonata op. 25 is another four-movement sonata, like op. 22, this time first published in Paris in 1827 on Sor’s return from Russia, where it may have been composed. Like the sonata op. 22, this sonata op. 25 is again in C and again has four movements: andante largo, allegro non troppo, andantino grazioso (theme and variations), and minuet.

Opus 26: Variations on ‘Que ne suis-je la fougère’
Sor’s variations on “Que ne suis-je la fougère” op. 26 were published in Paris in 1827, shortly after Sor’s return from Russia where they may have been composed. A fine miniature work, with rippling light tracery.

Opus 27: Variations on “Gentil housard”
Sor’s variations on “Gentil housard” op. 27 were published in Paris in 1827, shortly after Sor’s return from Russia where they may have been composed.

Opus 28: Variations on “Malbroug”
Sor’s variations on “Malbroug”, op. 28, were published in Paris in 1827, shortly after his return from Russia where they may have been composed.

Opus 29: Twelve studies
Sor’s second set of studies for the guitar, op. 29, was published in Paris in 1827 shortly after his return from Russia where it is likely that they were composed.
The studies op. 29 nos. 20 and 21 are FREE TO EVERYBODY. Study no. 20 has special instructions given by Sor which if followed give a special sonority to the piece.

Opus 30: Fantasia
Sor’s fantasia op. 30 consists of two sets of variations. It was first published in Paris in 1828 and dedicated to Sor’s colleague Dionisio Aguado.

Opus 31: 24 progressive lessons
Sor’s 24 progressive lessons for the guitar, op. 31, were first published in Paris in 1828. In this work he is writing specifically, to quote the title-page, for “les Elèves Commençants” (beginning pupils).
The lesson op. 31 no.3 is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 32: Six petites pièces
Sor’s Six petites pièces op. 32 were first published in Paris in 1828 with the title Six petites pièces faciles et doigtées avec soin (Six short and easy pieces, carefully fingered).
As with earlier sets of six short pieces—notably his opp. 1 and 2—it is clear that Sor took care to arrange the pieces in contrasting order of tempo and of key. It would make good sense to perform the six pieces as a set.
The set is dedicated to a young English lady, Miss Wainwright.
The Mazurka op. 32 no. 4 and the Galop op. 32 no. 6 are FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 33: Trois pièces de société
Sor’s three Pièces de Société op. 33 were published in Paris in 1828. Each of the three pieces consists of three movements. The first is a Moderato cantabile followed by a catchy Allegretto, a kind of rondo; the second an Andante followed by a waltz; and the third breaks new ground in its combination of forms, being a Sicilienne followed by a March with a trio entirely in harmonics. In each of the three pairs it is made very clear that the first movement leads straight into the second, without a break.

Opus 35: 24 very easy exercises
Sor’s 24 very easy exercises op. 35 were first published in Paris in 1828. The original title was Vingt quatre exercices très faciles et soigneusement doigtés (24 very easy exercises, carefully fingered).
With his 24 progressive lessons op. 31, Sor had already composed instructional pieces which were a good deal easier than his previous studies in op. 6 and op. 29. He had given the title Lessons to those easier pieces of op. 31. However, it seems that these were not easy enough, for a preface to op. 35 says that certain people had said to him that they required too rapid a progress and aimed too high. Therefore he composed this op. 35, a set of extraordinarily easy pieces for beginners, which he called not studies, and not lessons, but Exercises.
Op. 35 no. 5 and op. 35 no. 22 are FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 36: Trois pièces de société
Sor’s Trois Pièces de Société op. 36 were first published in Paris in 1828. They are another set of three Pièces de Société, like op. 33, each consisting of two linked pieces. The first is a minuet followed by an allemande; the second, Lento cantabile and minuet; and the third, Andantino and Chasse. The pairs of pieces are not joined without a break, as they were in op. 33; nevertheless, it is clear that each pair should be performed together, because of the contrasting nature of the two pieces in each case.

Opus 37: Sérénade
Sor’s Sérénade op. 37 was first published in Paris in 1828 or 1829.

Opus 40: Fantasia on a favourite Scottish air (“Ye banks and braes”)
Sor’s Fantasia on a favourite Scottish air op. 40 by Sor (Ye banks and braes o’ bonnie Doon) has caught the imagination of the guitar world in recent years, and is well on its way to becoming a standard part of the guitar repertory. It used to be little known, and my performance of it on BBC Scotland in 1972 was probably the first for very many years. In 1978, for the bicentenary of Sor’s birth, I published it in my edition of Sor’s Complete Works for Guitar, and John Williams played it in the celebratory concert in February of that year at the Queen Elizabeth Hall in London. Alice Artzt included the work in her record Guitar Music by Fernando Sor and it was broadcast several times from that record by the BBC, and since then, whenever it has been played, it has immediately caught the audience’s imagination.

Opus 42: Six petites pièces
Sor’s Six petites pièces op. 42 are another set of six short pieces, carefully arranged to form a unified whole which could well be performed complete. Two pieces in the same key begin the set; then a longer one in a different key; then a marvellously rhythmic piece which resembles nothing so much as a Ländler; and finally, another waltz. First published in Paris in 1830-31.

Opus 43: Mes ennuis
Sor’s Mes ennuis, six bagatelles, op. 43, was first published in Paris in 1830-31. It is another set of six pieces. Once again there are two pieces in the same key followed by a longer one in a different key, and then come three other pieces contrasting in both tempo and key. The title, “Mes ennuis”, or “My cares”, is discussed in the notes to op. 48 in this edition.
The Waltz op. 43 no. 6 is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 44: 24 short progressive pieces
Sor’s Vingt-quatre petites pièces progressives pour la guitare pour servir de leçons aux élèves tout à fait commençants, op. 44 (24 short progressive pieces for the guitar, to serve as lessons for absolute beginners) are short and easy pieces for beginners and were first published in Paris in 1830 or early 1831, so they are contemporary with Sor’s Méthode of 1830.
Op. 44 nos. 17 and 18, and op. 44 no. 24, are FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 45: Voyons si c’est ça
Sor’s Voyons si c’est ça op. 45 was first published in Paris in about 1831. The title means “Let’s see if this is it” and is discussed in the notes to op. 48 in this edition.
The Andante, no. 5 in this collection, was published by Isaias Savio in his anthology of works by Sor published by Ricordi in Buenos Aires, and was the first work by Sor which I played. This Andante op. 45 no. 5 is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 46: Souvenir d’amitié
Sor’s Souvenir d’amitié op. 46 was first published in Paris in about 1831. The title means “Memento of friendship”. It is a long work dedicated to the child prodigy Giulio Regondi, who was only eight years old at the time and who later produced splendid virtuoso music for the guitar.

Opus 47: Six petites pièces progressives
Sor’s Six petites pièces progressives op. 47 were first published in Paris in about 1832.

Opus 48: Est-ce bien ça?
Sor’s Est-ce bien ça op. 48 was first published in Paris in about 1832. The title means “Let’s see if this is it”. The work has to be understood in the context of a certain polemic, which is explained in the notes to this edition.

Opus 50: Le calme
Sor’s Le calme op. 50 is a long and interesting work, first published in Paris in about 1832.

Opus 51: À la bonne heure!
Sor’s À la bonne heure, six waltzes, op. 51, was first published in Paris in about 1832. For a discussion of the context of this work, see the notes to op. 48 in this edition. The title means: “At last!”.

Opus 52: Fantaisie villageoise
Sor’s Fantaisie villageoise op. 52 is an impressionistic piece with the gaiety of a village dance, first published in Paris in about 1832. Sor performed it in his last known benefit concert, on April 24th 1836.

Opus 54: Morceau de concert
Sor’s Morceau de Concert op. 54 was first published in Paris in 1832 or 1833 and was dedicated by Sor to Princess Adélaïde, sister of the king Louis-Philippe. The form of the piece, like that of L’Encouragement (op. 34) or Les Deux Amis (op. 41), is, once again, an introduction, theme with variations and coda, and a fast dance, here an Allegro in waltz time. It is a major work.

Opus 56: Souvenirs d’une soirée à Berlin
Sor’s Souvenirs d’une soirée à Berlin op. 56 was published in Paris in 1833-35. Sor had passed through Berlin in 1823 on his way to Russia, and probably again on his return to Paris in 1827. The piece (after the introduction) is a single long swirling waltz and could be splendid in performance. If it recalls an evening in Berlin, was the event a ball, perhaps? Or a ballet at a theatre?

Opus 57: Six valses et un galop
Sor’s Six valses et un galop op. 57 were first published in Paris in 1834-35. They are short and simple pieces dedicated to a pupil.
The Galop from op. 57 is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 58: Fantaisie
Sor’s Fantaisie op. 58 was first published in Paris in about 1835 and consists of a slow introduction, an Andante, and a waltz.

Opus 59: Fantaisie élégiaque
Sor’s op. 59, the Fantaisie Élégiaque à la mort de Madame Beslay, née Levavasseur, is a threnody, a lamentation on a death, a work of unrelieved grief. In one sense it is specific, in that the title-page tells us the name of the person on whose death it was composed. In another sense it is personal, for the composer himself had not long to live. And in a final sense, it can be regarded as an eloquent reflection on death as part of the human condition. It was first published, and probably composed, in Paris in about 1835.

Opus 60: Introduction to the study of the guitar
Sor’s op. 60, the Introduction à l’étude de la guitare, is a fine collection of pieces for absolute beginners on the guitar. It was his last work for solo guitar. He writes in a preface that this is an important work for beginners, because he has taken care that the pieces, though simple, shall be composed according to principles which are compatible with further progress towards the performance of more advanced music.
The Andante and Allegro op. 60 nos. 14 and 15 are FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Works without opus number:
Air varié (WoO 01)
This Air Varié (WoO 01) is an otherwise unknown work by Sor published only by Castro in 1810 or shortly before.

Thema varié (WoO 02)
This set of variations by Sor, published by Castro in 1810 or shortly before, uses the same theme as his op. 20.

Four minuets (WoO 03)
These four minuets (WoO 03) are an otherwise unknown work by Sor published only by Castro in 1810 or shortly before.

March from Cendrillon (WoO 04)
This arrangement of the March from Cendrillon, for guitar, was published in Paris in about 1823-25.

La Candeur (WoO 05)
Sor’s La candeur is an eloquent work, published in the Encyclopédie Pittoresque de la Musique (Paris, 1835).

Exercises from the method
These exercises are taken from Sor’s Méthode pour la guitare (Paris, 1830).

Appendix: Meditación
This work for solo guitar, Meditación, may or may not be by Sor. For the arguments either way, please see the complete preface.

GUITAR DUETS

Opus 34: L’encouragement, score and parts
Sor’s L’Encouragement op. 34 for two guitars was first published in Paris in about 1828, with the full title of L’Encouragement, Fantaisie à deux guitares dédiée à une de ses Elèves (L’Encouragement, fantasy for two guitars, dedicated to one of his lady pupils). It is a didactic work for beginning students, and it is the first of the twelve works for two guitars which Sor published in Paris.
The first movement of op. 34, a Cantabile, is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 38: Divertissement, score and parts
This Divertissement op. 38 for two guitars by Sor was first published in Paris in 1829-30.

Opus 39: Six valses, score and parts
Sor’s Six valses op. 39 for two guitars were first published in Paris in 1829-30. Only no. 2 is originally by Sor; the other five are arrangements by Sor from other composers.
The Waltz by Sor op. 39 no. 2 for two guitars is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Opus 41: Les deux amis, score and parts
Sor’s duet for two guitars Les deux amis op. 41 is one of the most celebrated of his duets, a major work on a level with the Mozart variations (op. 9) or the sonata op. 25. The form is an introduction (andante largo), a theme with five variations, and a mazurka. It was first published in Paris in 1829-30 with the title Les deux amis, fantaisie pour deux guitares, and dedicated to Aguado.
Instead of the parts being marked Première Guitare and Seconde Guitare as they are in other duets, here they are headed Sor and Aguado. The two parts shine in alternate variations: Sor in variations 1 and 3, Aguado in variations 2 and 4; variation 5 is an opportunity for both; and in the mazurka they are equal in importance.

Opus 44 bis: Six valses, score and parts
Sor’s Six Valses op. 44 bis for two guitars were published in Paris in 1831 and dedicated to “Mademoiselle Lira”, presumably the daughter of José de Lira, a Spaniard living in Paris and a friend of Sor.

Opus 49: Divertissement militaire, score and parts
Sor’s Divertissement militaire for two guitars op. 49 was first published in Paris in about 1832.

Opus 53: Le premier pas vers moi, score and parts
Sor’s Le premier pas vers moi or “The first step towards me” for two guitars, op. 53, was first published in Paris in 1832-33. It is a simple work for beginners. The original title is as follows: Le premier pas vers moi. Petit duo pour deux guitares composé et dédié à ceux qui ayant appris à jouer de cet instrument, voyent de grandes difficultés où il n’y a que de la correction (“The first step towards me. A small duet for two guitars, composed and dedicated to those who, having learnt to play this instrument, see great difficulties where there is only correct writing.”)

Opus 54 bis: Fantaisie, score and parts
Sor’s Fantaisie op. 54 bis for two guitars, published in Paris in about 1833, is a remarkable work in the history of Spanish music and its diffusion throughout Europe. It contains a fine movement dans le genre espagnol (“in the Spanish style”), the first and only piece for guitar without voice which he is known to have written in the popular Spanish style.

Opus 55: Trois duos, score and parts
Sor’s Trois duos faciles et progressifs by Sor for two guitars, op. 55, were published in Paris in 1833-34. The full title was Trois duos faciles et progressifs pour deux guitares composés et soigneusement doigtés par Ferdinand Sor (“Three easy and progressive duos for two guitars composed and carefully fingered by Fernando Sor”). They are more teaching pieces, simple and charming.

Opus 61: Trois petits divertissements, score and parts
Sor’s Trois petits divertissements op. 61 for two guitars were published in Paris in 1837.

Opus 62: Divertissement, score and parts
Sor’s Divertissement op. 62 for two guitars was first published in Paris in about 1838.

Opus 63: Souvenir de Russie, score and parts
Sor’s Souvenir de Russie op. 63 for two guitars is his last work, and a magnificent one. It was first published in Paris in 1838-39 with the title Souvenir de Russie, fantaisie pour deux guitares. The composer takes two very Russian melodies, and shows great understanding of their essential nature in the way in which he intertwines them.
The theme from Souvenir de Russie is FREE TO EVERYBODY.

Bolero a Duo, score and parts
This Bolero a duo with parts for two guitars presents problems regarding its nature, on which please see the complete preface at the end of this file.